The Best Graphic Equalizer: A Guide to Choosing the Right Monitor

by John Sanderson

The best graphic equalizer is not simply a product that you can buy off of the shelf. If you are looking for the best, it will take some research to find the best monitor for your needs. There are many different types to choose from, each with its features and specifications, so it takes time to get acquainted with them. We have put together this guide on how to find the best one for you!

If you are in a hurry, here are the suggested Graphic Equalizer for you:

Product
Clarion EQS755 7-Band Car Audio Graphic Equalizer with Front 3.5mm Auxiliary Input, Rear RCA Auxiliary Input and High Level Speaker Inputs, BLACK
Gravity 7 Band Graphic Equalizer GR-EQ9
Skar Audio SKA7EQ 7 Band 1/2 DIN Pre-Amp Car Audio Graphic Equalizer with Aux Input and High Voltage RCA Outputs
Clarion EQS755 7-Band Car Audio Graphic Equalizer with Front 3.5mm Auxiliary Input, Rear RCA Auxiliary Input and High Level Speaker Inputs, BLACK
Gravity 7 Band Graphic Equalizer GR-EQ9
Skar Audio SKA7EQ 7 Band 1/2 DIN Pre-Amp Car Audio Graphic Equalizer with Aux Input and High Voltage RCA Outputs
Product
Clarion EQS755 7-Band Car Audio Graphic Equalizer with Front 3.5mm Auxiliary Input, Rear RCA Auxiliary Input and High Level Speaker Inputs, BLACK
Clarion EQS755 7-Band Car Audio Graphic Equalizer with Front 3.5mm Auxiliary Input, Rear RCA Auxiliary Input and High Level Speaker Inputs, BLACK
Product
Gravity 7 Band Graphic Equalizer GR-EQ9
Gravity 7 Band Graphic Equalizer GR-EQ9
Product
Skar Audio SKA7EQ 7 Band 1/2 DIN Pre-Amp Car Audio Graphic Equalizer with Aux Input and High Voltage RCA Outputs
Skar Audio SKA7EQ 7 Band 1/2 DIN Pre-Amp Car Audio Graphic Equalizer with Aux Input and High Voltage RCA Outputs

Top 10 Best Graphics Equalizer Reviewed

1

The Clarion EQS755 is a 7-band graphic equalizer with a built-in low-pass filter and 6 channel/8 Volt RCA outputs (front, rear, and subwoofer). It features a 1/2 DIN chassis, blue illumination independent master volume, and subwoofer level Control with fader control selectable 12Db low-pass Filter (60Hz or 90Hz) Ground loop isolation circuit. The EQS755 has 3.5mm Front aux input, 2-channel RCA aux input with variable gain adjustments, and high-level speaker inputs.

2

Powerful 3-band graphic equalizer with 7V RMS output. It includes a crossover filter for the subwoofer, bass boost, and remote control. The unit is made of heavy-duty aluminum alloy to ensure durability and stability when used at maximum power capacity. It can be connected to any audio amplifier with RCA outputs or to an existing factory stereo system via the preamp outputs.

3

The Skar Audio SKA7EQ 7 Band 1/2 DIN Pre-Amp Car Audio Electronic Equalizer has a frequency response of 20 Hz to 20 kHz. It features six RCA inputs (3 pairs) for connecting your source components, including the option to connect an additional pair of front or rear preamp outputs. The front and rear channels feature variable gain control for adjusting the output level of each channel independently.

4

The SKA7EQ is a 7-band equalizer with a subwoofer crossover. The unit features an adjustable gain control, output level display, and EQ slide control. There are also subwoofer Xover points and a Subwoofer switch. The frequency range for the center frequencies of each band is 60Hz, 150Hz, 400Hz, 1kHz, 2.5kHz, 6kHz, and 15kHz, respectively, with +/- 12dB of equalization range.

5

The Blaupunkt CEBP871 7-Band graphic equalizer is a perfect option for those looking to adjust the sound of their car stereo. The 7-band equalizer has been designed with precision and accuracy in mind, ensuring that you get the best possible sound from your music system. This unit features a pre-graphic frequency of 50hz, 125hz, 315hz, 750hz, 2.2khz, 6Khz, and 16KHZ, which allows you to customize the sound exactly how you want it.

6

The Clarion EQS755 7-Band Graphic Equalizer is a must-have for any car audio enthusiast. This equalizer features a 7-band graphic equalizer, 6-channel / 7 volt RCA outputs, adjustable master volume level control, and adjustable subwoofer level control. The 2 channel RCA AUX input with adjustable gain and selectable 12dB low pass crossover (60Hz or 90Hz) allows you to connect your MP3 player or another portable music device to this unit.

7

The Timpano TPT-EQ7 7 Band Graphic Equalizer is a 1/2 DIN graphic equalizer/crossover. The TPT-EQ7 features 6 channels of RCA line-level outputs and 2 selectable inputs. The subwoofer level control allows you to adjust the volume of the subwoofer channel independently from the main channels. This is an ideal addition to your home or commercial audio system.

8

The EMB Professional Sound System EB831EQ Graphic Equalizer is a professional graphic equalizer with an 8-band frequency and gains adjustable. It has the ability to adjust the input gain control, EQ selection key, 40Hz low-frequency cut filter, and noise reduction circuit. The use of high-quality components and advanced technology to ensure that this product can meet the needs of users in many fields such as live performances, recording studios, and other audio applications.

9

This is a multi-effects processor with an integrated mixer. It has ten bands of graphic EQ per channel and a multi-colored spectrum analyzer display showing the output of the system. It also includes LEDs in all sliders, two line inputs, and dual tape monitor loops, tuner, CD, TAPE & DVD inputs!
The power supply MAX:20W is included inside it.

10

This Audiopipe EQ-709X 7-Band Graphic In-Dash Equalizer features a host of specialized controls for easy adjustment of your audio system. The graphic center frequencies include 50 Hz, 125 Hz, 315 Hz, 750 Hz, 2.2 kHz, 6 kHz, and 16 kHz with a subwoofer frequency of 60Hz/90H to give you the sound quality that you want in your vehicle. It has adjustable sensitivity control for each individual left and right channel for auxiliary input, and it also includes three stereo RCA outputs.

Things You Must Know While Choosing The Best Graphic Equalizer

How will this EQ be used?

Graphic equalizers have certain bands that allow you to boost or cut a specific frequency by a pre-determined amount – 20 Hz, 100 Hz, 200 Hz, etc., up to 8k. The spacing between the bands is usually uniform, so if you need very large boosts or cuts at certain frequencies, Graphic EQs will not be for you. They are best suited for more minor adjustments of frequency bands – cutting or boosting by 3 dB or less.

If you need to make very large boosts or cuts at certain frequencies, a Parametric Equalizer (PEQ) may fit your needs better. This type of equalizer allows the user to set the center point of the boost/cut and then adjust that level up or down as needed, essentially giving them infinitely more control over what they’re equalizing than with a Graphic EQ.

What is my budget?

Graphic Equalizers can be found anywhere between $50 – $25,000 depending on how many channels they come with and what features are included. If you need more than 8 channels, the price will go up significantly. Furthermore, if you want to be able to control all of your parameters (high, low pass filters, and volume) without moving faders on your console; expect to pay closer to $200-$25,000

What is my experience level?

It’s important to note that Parametric Equalizers can be very overwhelming if you don’t know what you’re doing-especially multi-band compressors. I’ve seen people spend hours trying to get just one sound out of them before finally giving up and calling an engineer or an aficionado at their local music store for help. If you feel like you need a lot of hand-holding before making adjustments on your new EQ, maybe buying an easier model would be best for you. More advanced PMQs and MBCs will present you with a world of possibilities but give you very few presets to work from. Generally, the more controls you have over your EQ – the more complicated it can get. If you’re not confident in your mixing skills just yet, don’t go crazy picking out an expensive parametric equalizer.

Will this EQ be rack-mounted or used on a console?

All of the PMQs mentioned above are available in 1U and 2U rack-mountable models. If you need to purchase two or three of these units at once, make sure they all fit in one rack case; otherwise, it’ll cost you extra (you could buy a custom-fitted case and pack them together yourself, though). MBCs come in analog and digital formats, but if you buy an analog model, make sure your console supports it. While not completely necessary, it’s best to buy equipment that can play nice together if possible.

What is the physical size of the EQs?

This one may seem like a no-brainer, but I’ve seen people make this mistake before, so it bears mentioning. Make sure your rack case (if you need one) or console has enough room for your new EQs! Take measurements beforehand and compare them to the dimensions of the equipment you’re looking at, then pray they’ll all fit inside your rack case/console.or get a custom-fitted case for multiple units. With engineers these days living on a shoestring budget with minimal gear, any extra weight or size could be a deal-breaker.

3 Advantages Of Graphic Equalizer

1) Enhance Recordings

Using a graphic equalizer allows you to enhance any recording, which means that if you want your songs to sound better, you simply have to add more bass, treble, or mid-range sounds through an EQ filter. Some people find that they’re able to hear specific music better with a graphic equalizer turned on, even though these same songs might sound perfectly fine without the EQ filter. If you want to be able to hear your music better, a graphic equalizer might be useful for you because it can help add sounds that other people cannot hear. It’s important to note that if you’re adding frequencies in an area where no instruments are playing, the results will not improve your song. It might even make it harder to hear certain parts of the track depending on how much sound is added and where the additional frequencies fall in the original recording.

2) Create an Acoustic Setting

Graphic equalizers can also be used to create an acoustic setting which means that if you want your songs to sound like they’re being played in a different location than what was originally intended, such as a large stadium or outdoor amphitheater, you can use an EQ filter to create that effect. Some people like how using a graphic equalizer for this purpose makes their recordings sound because it adds the feeling of being at a live performance without actually having to attend one. Keep in mind that if you adjust frequencies too much at once, your song might sound like it’s echoing even if you don’t want it to. It is recommended that you start with only 2-3 different frequency bands and then test each set before moving on to more frequency adjustments.

3) Practice Makes Perfect

Finally, practicing how to use a graphic equalizer can make it perfect because many people find that they’re able to get better results depending on what kind of system they have. If you have a high-quality sound system, your songs might sound better when you add more mid-frequency sounds. On the other hand, if you own a low-quality sound system, your songs might sound better with more treble and bass. It’s important to remember that even though several benefits of using a graphic equalizer for recording or practicing, they should not be used as a permanent solution or in place of professional audio mastering services. In order to get the best possible results from any song, make sure to combine EQ filters with additional mixing and editing techniques for the best final product.

To Wrap Up

We hope this guide has helped you find the perfect monitor for your needs. If not, or if you have any questions, please let us know in the comment below.

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